Motorised Bike Laws - Australia

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ZBOX AUSTRALIA
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Australian State Laws

This is only to be used as a general guide. Legislation and road rules are subject to change therefore you are strongly advised to check your local jurisdiction for up to date information. All bicycle riding regulations (helmets, road rules etc.) apply equally to motorised bicycle riders. This information was updated on 25 April 2014.

QUEENSLAND

Rules for motorised bicycles

There are 2 types of legal motorised bicycle. For the first type, the electric motor must not be capable of generating more than 200 watts of power. For the second type, know as a 'pedalec', the vehicle must comply with the European Standard for Power Assisted Pedal Cycles (EN15194). The vehicle must have a permanent marking on it that shows it complies with the standard. A compliant pedalec can have up to 250 watts of power. But the motor cuts out at 25km/h and the pedals must be used to keep the motor operating. It is illegal to ride a bicycle on roads or road-related areas (such as paths) if the bicycle has an internal combustion engine (for example, a petrol or diesel motor) attached.

[ZBox note: The above section is taken from the QLD GOvernment web site. Legislation, however, appears to be the same as all other states which alow the fitting of any motor under 200W. We are not legal experts so, if fitting a pertol motor to your bike for use on public roads, we advise you confirm with your legal adviser]

Motorised bicycles are required to adhere to the same road rules as bicycles and have the same rights and responsibilities. Motorised bicycles are exempt from registration and compulsory third party insurance.

A two-wheeled vehicle with an internal combustion engine, or an electric motor capable of generating over 200 watts, must comply with the Australian Design Rules* requirements for a motorbike if it is to be ridden on roads or road-related areas.

When riding a motorised bicycle you must:

wear an approved bicycle helmet securely fitted and fastened.

The motorised bicycle must have:

a bell or horn
at least 1 effective brake.

When riding at night you must display:

a white light at the front, visible for 200m
a red light at the back, visible for 200m
a red reflector at the back, visible for 50m.

You can ride a motorised bicycle on all roads and paths, except where bicycles are specifically excluded.

You do not need to have a driver licence to ride a motorised bicycle.

*The content found by using this link is not created, controlled or approved by this department. No responsibility is taken for the consequences of viewing content on this site. This link will load into a new window.

 

VICTORIA

Motorised Bicycles and Foot Scooters

A power assisted bicycle is identical to a pedal powered bicycle, except it has an auxiliary motor. Power assisted bicycles have two definitions in Victoria:

A bicycle with an auxiliary motor(s) producing less than a total of 200 watts at the wheel, and where the power is additional to using the pedals.
A bicycle with auxiliary power producing no more than 250 watts and specifies this as a continuous rating. It also restricts the top power assisted speed to 25 kilometres per hour, requires the rider to pedal to access the power. This type of motorised bicycle is known as a pedalec.

Auxiliary motor means that the primary propulsion is via pedalling and the motor is simply to assist.

Power assisted bicycles as described here are likely to have similar performance characteristics to pedal powered bicycles so the same road rules apply to them. These types of power assisted bicycles are not required to be registered nor the rider required to be licensed.
A motorised bicycle is not classed as a bicycle if:

  • the motor is the primary source of power
  • the motor's power output exceeds 200 watts (whether or not the motor is operating).

Source: www.vicroads.vic.gov.au  


NEW SOUTH WALES

There are two types of power-assisted pedal cycles.

Maximum power output 200 watts
For power-assisted pedal cycles other than pedalecs (see below), the auxiliary motor/s must not be capable of producing a combined maximum power output exceeding 200 watts, whether or not the motor/s is operating.

[ZBox note: The following phrase is mis-informed as ZBox have a 200W petrol motor which we have certified in NSW government approved Dyno test facilities. Every ZBox 200W motor is provided with a certificate of compliance stating that the motor produces less than 200W. The cerificate includes the serial number of the motor and has is signed by an independant engineer who fitted our restrictor kit]

Note: It is virtually impossible for a bicycle fitted with an internal combustion motor to meet this requirement because an internal combustion motor limited to 200 watts is not capable of producing enough torque to propel the bicycle. For example, the cylinder of a petrol motor specifically designed to produce no more than 200 watts (equal to 0.268 horsepower) will have a capacity of about four or five cubic centimetres, the size of a standard medical syringe.


Maximum power output 250 watts (‘pedalec’)
A ‘pedalec’ is a vehicle complying with the requirements of European Standard EN 15194: 2009 or EN 15194:2009+A1:2009: Cycles – Electrically power assisted cycles – EPAC Bicycles. To comply with EN 15194:
The motor must be electric.
The maximum continuous power output of the motor cannot exceed 250 watts measured at the wheel.
Note: A motor that delivers 250 watts of continuous power can produce greater power for very short periods of time, which can be beneficial when pulling away at traffic lights or starting a hill climb.
The rider must pedal the cycle to activate the motor.
Note: Pedalecs may be equipped with an optional low-speed start-up mode that allows the motor to power the cycle up to 6 km/h. This mode is activated by the user either when riding without pedalling or when the user is pushing the cycle.
The motor must cut-off once the vehicle reaches 25 km/h, or sooner if the rider stops pedalling.
The vehicle must be certified by the manufacturer, and labelled as complying with EN 15194. The label must include the manufacturer’s name, the motor’s cut-off speed in km/h and its continuous rated power in watts.

 

WEST AUSTRALIA

Power-assisted bicycles

A power-assisted pedal cycle (PAPC) is a bicycle with a motor providing assistance when the rider is pedalling.
In Western Australia PAPC can be used by people aged 16 years and older on shared paths with the power engaged. To be compliant, a PAPC can only have a maximum power output of 200 watts.

A PAPC which uses the engine as the primary source of power and/or has an engine capacity which exceeds 200 watts is classified as a motorbike and must be registered and ridden by a licenced rider and cannot be ridden on shared paths. The smallest petrol engines (i.e. internal combustion engine) commonly have a power output exceeding 200 watts and are therefore illegal.

[ZBox note: The above phrase is correct for most bicycle motors purchased through eBay. ZBox, however, have a 200W petrol motor specifically designed to comply with Australian motorised bicycle laws. Our 200W motors have been passed by government approved Dyno test facilities. Every ZBox 200W motor is provided with a certificate of compliance stating that the motor produces less than 200W. The cerificate includes the serial number of the motor and has is signed by an independant engineer who fitted our restrictor kit]

Source: http://www.transport.wa.gov.au/mediaFiles/active-transport/AT_CYC_P_cycling_and_the_law.pdf


TASMANIA

Introduction

This Bulletin explains the legality of powered scooters, skateboards and bicycles, and miniature motor cycles etc.
Tasmanian Legislation

The Tasmanian Vehicle and Traffic Act 1999 defines a motor vehicle

"motor vehicle" means a vehicle that is built to be propelled by a motor that forms part of the vehicle but does not include;

an aircraft, or
a motor vehicle that travels only on a railway, tramway or other fixed track, or
a pedal cycle with an auxiliary motor (or motors) with a power output (or combined output) of not more than 200 watts; or
a self-propelled lawn mower that is not capable of traveling at a speed of more than 10km/h; or
a self-propelled wheelchair that is not capable of traveling at a speed of more than 10km/h, or
a self-propelled vehicle

(a) not capable of travelling at a speed of more than 10km/h; and
(b) designed for off-road work in construction, maintenance or warehouse operation; and
(c) only used on a public street for the purpose of loading or unloading the vehicle onto another vehicle, or manoeuvring at a work site.

Any scooter with a motor is considered to be a motor vehicle.

A motor vehicle must be registered if it is parked or used on a public street or a road related area. A motor vehicle must not be used on a footpath or shared pathway.

Policy

Any motorised vehicle which is not excluded from the definition of "motor vehicle" must be registered if it is used on a public street or a road related area.
To be eligible for registration all vehicles must comply with relevant Australian Design Rules and the Vehicle Standards and be fitted with an approved Australian compliance plate.
Any vehicle which is not fitted with an approved Australian compliance plate is not eligible for registration, and must not be used on a public street or road related area.
A pedal cycle with an auxiliary motor (or motors) with a power output (or combined output) of not more than 200 watts does not require to be registered and may be used on public streets and on road related areas. The rider does not need to hold a current drivers licence but must wear an approved bicycle helmet and obey all Road Rules.

Source: http://www.transport.tas.gov.au/vehicle_specifications/information_bulletins/scooters


SOUTH AUSTRALIA

What is a Power Assisted Bicycle?

A power assisted bicycle (or power-assisted pedal cycle) is a pedal cycle with a motor attached to assist the rider. The attached motor may provide assistance but the pedals must be the main means of propulsion.

In South Australia, there are two categories of power assisted bicycles that may be used legally on our roads:

power assisted bicycles with up to 200 Watts of power (the power is controlled by a throttle or accelerator); or
power assisted bicycles with no more than 250 Watts of continuous power which meet the definition of a pedalec (the power is controlled by the ride using the pedals).

What is a Pedalec?

In order to be a pedalec (legal for use on our roads), the power assisted bicycle must comply with the European Committee for Standardization EN 15194:2009 or EN 15194:2009+A1:2011 Cycles - Electrically power assisted cycles - EPAC Bicycle ('EN 15194') and this includes:

it must be certified by the manufacturer and labelled as complying with EN 15194. The label must have the manufacturer's name, the motor's cut off speed in km/h and its electric motor motor maximum continuous rated power in Watts. The label is often found on the bicycle's frame immediately adjacent to the crank;
the motor must be electric;
the maximum continuous power output of the motor cannot exceed 250 Watts;
the rider must pedal to access the power (the motor may operate without pedalling up to a speed of 6 km/h);
the power must cut out when the pedalec reaches 25 km/h or sooner (if the operator stops pedalling).

Road rules for power assisted bicycles

Riders do not require a driver's licence, motor vehicle registration or compulsory third party insurance. Riders are bound by the same rules as for other bicycles, including the need for:

the rider to wear a helmet;
effective brakes;
a bell, or other audible warning device;
a rear-facing red reflector at night;
a white light to the front and a red light to the rear at night (both may flash) clearly visible from at least 200 metres.

[ZBox note: There is a misleading photograph of a bycycle with a petrol motor fitted on the SA government web site. This has been included as most bicycle motors available from other suppliers exceed the 200W power limit. ZBox, however, have a 200W petrol motor specifically designed to comply with Australian motorised bicycle laws. Our 200W motors have been passed by government approved Dyno test facilities. Every ZBox 200W motor is provided with a certificate of compliance stating that the motor produces less than 200W. The cerificate includes the serial number of the motor and has is signed by an independant engineer who fitted our restrictor kit]

 


NORTHERN TERRITORY

We were unable to find any legislation pertaining to motorised pushbikes on the NT government web site. If you have information about legislation in the NT please let us pkow and we will add the information to our web page. We did find some old information that is no longer available:


A power-assisted cycle is essentially a complying bicycle that has been fitted with an engine or motor of some description. Powered cycles are defined in the NT Motor Vehicles Act as; A bicycle/tricycle that is equipped:
a) with pedals as a means of propulsion; and
b) with an engine or motor which is capable of producing a power output not exceeding 200 watts.
These bicycles are not required to be registered and can be ridden on the road network and in public places. All regulations relating to bicycles, including the requirement to wear helmets, apply.

General Information
The use of motorised scooters and power assisted cycles on private property is not regulated.

Source: http://www.ipe.nt.gov.au/whatwedo/mvr/vehiclestandards/pdf/ib-v56-2002-12.pdf


A.C.T.

Power Assisted Bicycles

The Road Transport (Vehicle Registration) Regulation 2000 describes vehicles that are exempt from registration provisions in the ACT.

Motor assisted pedal cycles with electric or petrol engines are exempt from registration, provided the maximum engine output power does not exceed 200 watts. These vehicles must have been designed as a bicycle - that is, to be propelled by human power, with the motor attached as a supplementary aid only.
Pedalecs are also exempt from registration. A Pedalec is a vehicle meeting European Committee for Standardization EN 15194:2009 Cycles – Electrically power assisted cycles – EPAC Bicycles. They have a maximum of 250 watts continuous rated power, must be pedalled to gain power assistance, have a maximum powered speed of 25km/h and may have a 6km/h twist and go capability without pedalling, to assist in getting off the line.

Riders must follow the same road rules as for pedal cycles without motors, including wearing a helmet.

Motorised wheelchairs and other types of disabled persons’ conveyances are exempt from registration and operators of these vehicles must comply with the same road rules as pedestrians. This is providing:


from Hobart Mercury - 11 March 2008

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